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Purple Mist celebrate in Grenada

An amazing achievement for the first Two-Handed all-female team to complete the RORC Transatlantic Race! Congratulations to Kate Cope and Claire Dresser on Sun Fast 3200 Purple Mist (GBR) after crossing the finish line in Grenada on 29th January at 02:36:10 UTC, in an elapsed time of 20 days 12hrs 26 mins.

Dockside at Camper & Nicholsons Port Louis Marina, Kate Cope said: “I’m really proud. In a way, I knew I could do it. Getting to the start is one of the hardest things and everybody says that. I just hope that us doing this race will inspire other doublehanders to do it. You learn a lot about yourself and it’s an amazing experience.” Claire Dresser: “I feel so happy, I can’t believe that we’ve actually done it. Now that I’m here it’s quite emotional and it’s an incredible experience.”

Picture: Kate Cope & Claire Dresser safely moored in Camper & Nicholsons Port Louis Marina © Arthur Daniel/RORC

VIDEO: EH01's Adventure across the Atlantic

The EHO1 crew before the start in Lanzarote © James Mitchell

The crew on board Global Yacht Racing’s First 47.7 had a blast racing crossing the Atlantic in just over 17 days (elapsed), arriving in Grenada on Wednesday 25 January. “We made sure this trip we had a halfway party, where we made silly hats, had cupcakes and a good dinner that night. We had a little competition between the watches to see who could get the fastest VMG, and an awful lot of laughing! I’m happier nowhere else than on the ocean. It was great!” said skipper Neil Maher.

VIDEO: Catch up with Peter and Duncan Bacon from Sea Bear

Peter and Duncan Bacon, the father & son crew of Sea Bear © Arthur Daniel/RORC

Catch up with Peter and Duncan Bacon - the father and son team who have been sailing Two-Handed together for two and a half years on their Sun Fast 300 Sea Bear. The duo completed the RORC Transatlantic Race in an elapsed time of: 16 days 10 hrs 21 mins 04 secs. “It was one of the great adventures of my life. It was a really fantastic opportunity and I’d happily do it again,” said Duncan Bacon dockside in Grenada. “I was generally impressed. He (Duncan) was resourceful, he was calm, he was helpful. It was a joint effort. It wasn’t a captain and crew effort at all,” explained father Peter Duncan. On board footage and dockside interview.

UPPING THE ANTE FOR THE 50TH ROLEX FASTNET RACE

Catherine and Niklas Zennström won both the 2009 and 2011 Rolex Fastnet Races and their CF520 Rán 8 was built in the hope of making it a hattrick in this 50th edition of the race © Paul Wyeth/RORC
James Boyd reviews some of the latest hardware built or acquired especially for this

year's historic race.

Winning the world’s largest offshore yacht race comes with huge prestige. Names on the Fastnet Challenge Cup, presented to the overall corrected time winner of the Rolex Fastnet Race since its first edition in 1925, include Jolie Brise, Dorade, Myth of Malham, Carina II, Pen Duick III, Condor, Nicorette, Morning Glory, Nokia, Rán 2, and more recently from France; Night and Day, Courrier Du Leon and Lann Ael 2, plus the American VO70 Wizard and the defending British champion, Sunrise. Today the Fastnet Challenge Cup is presented to the corrected time winner in IRC Overall.

However, this July’s Rolex Fastnet Race will be the 50th edition of the Royal Ocean Racing Club’s premier event. For this special historic event, several are building or acquiring yachts with the specific aim of getting their name on the trophy.

Ino Noir - RORC Commodore James Neville's new 45ft Carkeek design is currently in build with a view to being competitive in 600 mile offshore races, especially the Rolex Fastnet RaceIno Noir - RORC Commodore James Neville's new 45ft Carkeek design is currently in build with a view to being competitive in 600 mile offshore races, especially the Rolex Fastnet Race

Ino Noir - Carkeek 45 - James Neville

Leading this charge is Commodore of the RORC James Neville who is replacing his highly successful Ino XXX with a new 45ft Carkeek design currently being built by Jason Carrington’s team near Southampton.

The new Ino Noir is a development of his present HH42, which the Commodore has raced both inshore, in the FAST40+ class, and offshore, winning many races and notably finishing second to Sunrise in IRC Overall in the 2021 Rolex Fastnet Race. The aim of the new boat is to be competitive in the ever-growing international portfolio of 600 mile offshore races. Neville explains his approach: “Looking at how all the developments in the FAST40+ - hull shapes, appendages, rigs, sails etc – have come on, we wanted to capture that learning, just as the PAC52s have taken all the learning from the Super Series 52s, and applied that to an offshore boat.”

At 45ft the new Ino Noir will be slightly longer as Neville wants to continue racing with his same crew of 10. The boat features the typical Carkeek heavily chamfered foredeck, reverse sheer bow, twin rudders, wheel steering and water ballast tanks (480kg per side).

Rán 8 - CF520 - Niklas Zennström

In the same vein, but already racing, is Niklas Zennström’s Rán 8. This CF520 is again a Carkeek design, but was built by Fibre Mechanics in Lymington from the tooling of Richard Matthew’s Oystercatcher XXXV. Already in 2022 she enjoyed considerable success, finishing second to Ino XXX in the RORC’s Myth of Malham Race and winning the Channel Race, before coming fourth overall in last autumn’s Rolex Middle Sea Race.

With their all-conquering Maxi 72 Rán 2, Zennström’s team claimed the Fastnet Challenge Cup in the 2009 and 2011 (the first back-to-back winner since Carina II in 1955-57), but was unable to make it a hattrick in 2013. Zennström returns with his enthusiastic offshore racer wife Catherine for another attempt in 2023. 

“The first goal when we built the boat was for the 2023 Rolex Fastnet Race - the 50th anniversary, so obviously a big race,” explains Rán skipper Tim Powell. “Everything we are doing is leading up to that. We were quite happy that the Rolex Middle Sea Race was a light air race, because if the boat had a weakness then it would be in that, so we were pleased the boat performed pretty well. Now we are off to do the RORC Caribbean 600 which we assume will be in the boat’s more natural conditions, so more big learning for us.”

As to why the new Rán 8 is a 52 rather than another Maxi 72, the team has familiarity with that size having campaigned several TP52s and it is generally more manageable. Compared to a TP52, it has twin rudders, a more powerful hull shape and so is able to carry more sail area, but has a similar overall displacement, and carries 550kg water ballast tanks. It is much more offshore orientated, drier below with less through-deck systems and a more usable and comfortable living space. “This boat is a big boat downstairs,” continues Powell. “I am 6ft 2in and I can stand up.”

Catherine and Niklas Zennström won both the 2009 and 2011 Rolex Fastnet Races and their CF520 Rán 8 was built in the hope of making it a hattrick in this 50th edition of the race © Paul Wyeth/RORCCatherine and Niklas Zennström won both the 2009 and 2011 Rolex Fastnet Races and their CF520 Rán 8 was built in the hope of making it a hattrick in this 50th edition of the race © Paul Wyeth/RORC

Notorious - Maxi 72 - Peter Morton

While Zennström may not be fielding a Maxi 72, his FAST40+ rival Peter Morton is, having acquired the former Caol Ila R, now renamed Notorious.

Although better known for having breathed life back into the Quarter Ton class, campaigning a FAST40+ and more recently a 5.5mR, Morton grew up competing in the Admiral’s Cup. He explains: “2023 is a big year for me: I did my first Fastnet in 1973, so it will be 50 years on from that. This will be the 50th Fastnet. Plus I won the Fastnet in 1993, 30 years ago on Indulgence and again in 2003 on Enigma. So this also has a ‘3’ in it. Plus I will be 70, so the stars are aligned. They say you need a foot for every year you are old…especially to go offshore. We’ll do the RORC races as warm up and then have a go at the Fastnet.”

Morton also has a long association with Notorious’ designer Mark Mills, dating back to the beginnings of IRC when he commissioned the IRM 50 Mandrake from him. As Caol Ila R, Notorious has a strong pedigree: she won the Rolex Maxi 72 World Championship in 2014 and had an exceptional 2019 season winning, among others, the prestigious Rolex Giraglia offshore race from St Tropez to Monaco overall under IRC.

Despite her size, the Maxi 72 is a wet boat, but Morton says he will attempt to rectify this for his 2023 programme. Otherwise Notorious is ready to go. This will be Morton’s first Rolex Fastnet Race since winning on Charles Dunstone’s maxi in 2003.

Celebrating 50 years since his first Fastnet Race, Peter Morton will compete in his newly acquired Maxi 72 Notorious (formerly Caol Ila R) © Carlo Borlenghi/ROLEX Tulikettu - Infiniti 52 - Arto Linnervuo Celebrating 50 years since his first Fastnet Race, Peter Morton will compete in his newly acquired Maxi 72 Notorious (formerly Caol Ila R) © Carlo Borlenghi/ROLEX Tulikettu - Infiniti 52 - Arto Linnervuo

Tulikettu - Infiniti 52 - Arto Linnervuo

Launched in 2022 and another to watch will be Arto Linnervuo’s Infiniti 52 Tulikettu, which has a programme principally focussing on the world’s 600 mile offshore races. This includes the Rolex Fastnet Race, but also the RORC’s Roschier Baltic Sea Race, which starts and finishes in Helsinki in Linnervuo’s native Finland; a race which his company supports. Tulikettu is the first example of the Hugh Welbourn-designed Infiniti 52 and is equipped with a lateral, sliding Dynamic Stability Systems (DSS) foil, which when deployed provides added righting moment to leeward. Tulikettu recently sailed her first race, the RORC Transatlantic Race and is entered in the RORC Caribbean 600 too.

Arto Linnervuo’s Infiniti 52 Tulikettu has a programme principally focussing on the world’s 600 mile offshore races  © Rick Tomlinson/Infiniti YachtsArto Linnervuo’s Infiniti 52 Tulikettu has a programme principally focussing on the world’s 600 mile offshore races © Rick Tomlinson/Infiniti Yachts

Seahorse - Pogo S4 - Andrew Hurst

Meanwhile another icon of British sailing, Andrew Hurst, a leading sailor and now editor of Seahorse magazine, has bought a new Class40 with the aim of competing in the Rolex Fastnet Race and then the doublehanded Transat Jacques Vabre.

“It started when I went out to watch the last Fastnet start in 35 knots in my RIB,” Hurst explains. “Charlie Dalin (on the IMOCA Apivia) went past and gave me a big wave and I found myself thinking ‘I would like to do this again’. Then all the 40s started flying past - not as much fun, but still pretty good… It has been long enough that I have forgotten how horrible it can be!”

Hurst will be working with Joe Lacey to get his new Guillaume Verdier-designed Pogo S4, Seahorse, due for delivery in March.

From the mid-1980s, Hurst regularly competed in the Admiral’s Cup, his last having been on the British team’s ILC 40 Group 4 Seahorse Astro in 1995. He was attracted to the Class40 because of the quality of the boats, the calibre of the competitors, that today includes the cream of the Figaro fleet, but mostly because of the tight racing. Today he mostly races J/80s and his Finn dinghy, and while the Class40 is not a one design, it is a box rule, so close.

Andrew Hurst's Class40 v4 Seahorse © Sébastien PiquetAndrew Hurst's Class40 v4 Seahorse © Sébastien Piquet

Entry for the 50th Rolex Fastnet Race opened on 11 January 2023 and now stands at 489 in number.

https://www.rolexfastnetrace.com/

https://www.rolexfastnetrace.com/fr/

More arrivals in Grenada

The Sabre II crew after completing the Transatlantic Race © Arthur Daniel/RORC

On Monday 23rd January, dockside celebrations continued at Camper & Nicholsons Port Louis Marina in Grenada as the Czechia and Slovakia team on Miroslav Jakubcik and Marek Culen’s Akilaria 40 Sabre II finished the RORC Transatlantic Race at 03:18:57 UTC. The smallest boat competing in IRC Zero covered the 3,000nm race in an elapsed time of 14 days 13 hrs 08 mins 57 secs. Co-skippers Miroslav and Marek have raced against each other since childhood, but joined forces for their first transatlantic crossing, joined by crew members Tomas Zima and Ivan Cernosek. 

Five hours later, Laurent Courbin’s First 53 Yagiza (FRA), skippered by Philippe Falle were also welcomed to the dock with an ice-cold beer and warm Grenadian welcome, in the early hours of the morning in Grenada. Congratulations to the team on Yagiza which finished the race in just over 14 days 18 hours. On Tuesday 24th, Lionel Regnier’s 58ft Philippe Briand-designed L'Esprit D'Equipe finished the RORC Transatlantic Race with an elapsed time of 16 days 2 hrs 9 mins and 47 secs. With this crossing, Lionel Régnier has now completed 14 transatlantic races, including winning the OSTAR. His classic yacht L'Esprit D'Equipe also has a pedigree as she was the winner of the 1985 Whitbread Round the World Race. We look forward to seeing her in next month’s RORC Caribbean 600 when the crew will be joined by the winning skipper from the Whitbread, Lionel Péan.

The Yagiza crew enjoying the Grenadian dockside hospitality after the race © Arthur Daniel/RORCThe Yagiza crew enjoying the Grenadian dockside hospitality after the race © Arthur Daniel/RORC

L'Esprit D'Equipe arriving in Grenada © Arthur Daniel/RORCL'Esprit D'Equipe arriving in Grenada © Arthur Daniel/RORC

The Two-Handed team comprised of father and son, Peter and Duncan Bacon, on their Sun Fast 3300 Sea Bear finished the race on 25th January at 00:31:04 UTC, completing their RORC Transatlantic Race debut in an elapsed time of 16 days 10 hrs 21 mins 04 secs. Peter Bacon had previously competed in the 2019 Transatlantic Race (west to east) with Xp44 Lucy Georgina, winning IRC Racing 2 and notably beating Pata Negra and Teasing Machine after IRC time correction. They are the second Two-Handed team to finish in Grenada, with Purple Mist still to cover 500nm.

Peter and Duncan Bacon, the father & son crew of Sea Bear © Arthur Daniel/RORCPeter and Duncan Bacon, the father & son crew of Sea Bear © Arthur Daniel/RORC

Meanwhile, still at sea, but due to arrive today, EH01 send in their final blog:-

“We’ve got less than 24 hours to run on this amazing adventure, so time for the final blog,” writes Prue Nash from Global Yacht Racing’s First 47.7 EH01, which at time of writing had 44nm to go until the finish in Grenada.

Global Yacht Racing’s British First 47.7 EH01 has been racing with the Royal Ocean Racing Club for many years, but this was their first RORC Transatlantic Race. EH01’s Irish skipper, Neil Maher has an international crew from Canada, Germany, Great Britain and the United States.

“Last night was fun; we dropped the kite before a big dark squall cloud and hoisted it again after the squall. Dropped it again for the next squall and then spent the morning under a poled-out headsail in the increased breeze and sea state. Now we are back under our Ullman S4 and the world is looking good again. The poled-out headsail arrangement did manage to give us the highest speed of the trip though - Jasper got 12.79 knots. Sorry Beana, you aren’t the speed queen anymore!

“The finish is so close now, we can smell the showers - we really, really need one! Also, a cold beer, burgers, the pool and internet! We’ve received emails from our friends across the fleet who have finished already and have enjoyed hearing about some exciting spinnaker blow outs. Cannot wait to see everyone in Camper & Nicholsons Port Louis Marina for beers!,” concludes Prue, before sending a list of notables from the crossing:-

  • Sleeping bags lost - 1. It’s somewhere on this boat, but no one had found Jeremy’s sleeping bag
  • Tanks of water used – 3
  • Tanks of fuel used for charging our batteries - 1. The solar panels have worked really well in keeping us topped up all day
  • Gas Bottles - 1.25
  • Spinnaker hoists in the last 24 hours – 3
  • Anti-wrap nets that have got wrapped – 1
  • Shaves on the trip - 4. 1 for Jasper, 3 for Jeremy. Rest of the guys are happily growing beards
  • Best Joke of the trip - Frank for the ‘Chicken goes to the library’ joke

See you in Grenada today!

Much Love

Neil, Prue, Jasper, Jenn, Sam, Frank, Jeremy, Paul, Beana and Christina

The EHO1 crew before the start in Lanzarote © James MitcellThe EHO1 crew before the start in Lanzarote © James Mitchell

VIDEO: Pata Negra win IRC One

Pata Negra has won IRC One and completed the RORC Transatlantic Race in just under 14 days © Arthur Daniel/RORC

Father and son owners, Andrew and Sam Hall were racing Lombard 46 Pata Negra (GBR) for the second time in the RORC Transatlantic Race. Pata Negra finished the race on Sunday 22nd January in an elapsed time of 13 days 23 hours 45 mins 13 secs.

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Pen Duick and Pata Negra celebrate in Grenada

Marie Tabarly after completing the RORC Transatlantic Race in Grenada with her young team on Pen Duick VI (FRA)  © Arthur Daniel/RORC

Marie Tabarly’s 73ft ketch Pen Duick VI (FRA) finished the RORC Transatlantic Race on Sunday 22nd January in an elapsed time of 13 days 19 hours 33 mins 53 secs. Proudly displaying the flag of the Yacht Club de France, the Pen Duick crew of 12 are the youngest in the race and also have 50% women sailors on board. Pen Duick VI will next be competing in the new RORC organised Nelson’s Cup Series in Antigua in February.

“The Pen Duick crew has been selected for the 2023 Ocean Globe Race and this is our first race together. There is no better way to cross the Atlantic than to race,” commented Marie Tabarly. “For me, as long as I am at sea, I am happy, but this was not perfect conditions for Pen Duick. This boat likes to go upwind in heavy weather rather than downwind in light conditions, which we had for this race. However, it was very interesting for us to have the sensation and to work on the sail plan that we would like for the Ocean Globe Race.

“Pen Duick has a young crew, and there are not many boats like her. There is no school to race a boat like her. To gybe we need 11 people; we need to work together, stick together and have the vision of what is going on. Pen Duick is a heavy, powerful boat and you have to sail her in a very classical way which requires focus as well as spirit from the team. Having a team that can work together is much more important than if they are technically experienced.”

Celebrating after the finish in Grenada. Proudly displaying the flag of the Yacht Club de France, the Pen Duick crew of 12 were the youngest in the race © Arthur Daniel/RORCCelebrating after the finish in Grenada. Proudly displaying the flag of the Yacht Club de France, the Pen Duick crew of 12 were the youngest in the race © Arthur Daniel/RORC

Enjoying a cold beer on arrival © Arthur Daniel/RORCEnjoying a cold beer on arrival © Arthur Daniel/RORC

Pata Negra win IRC One
Father and son owners, Andrew and Sam Hall were racing Lombard 46 Pata Negra (GBR) for the second time in the RORC Transatlantic Race. Pata Negra finished the race on Sunday 22nd January in an elapsed time of 13 days 23 hours 45 mins 13 secs. Pata Negra was greeted dockside by the RORC Finish team, and with cold beers from Port Louis Marina. In 2022, Pata Negra was fourth in class and took over 15 days. This year, Pata Negra has won IRC One and completed the race in just under 14 days. Andrew Hall is the oldest competitor in this year’s race and Sam one of the youngest skippers.

“We saw a fishing boat about 50 miles off Barbados and they came and waved to us. It’s always exciting when you see another human being after 3,000 miles of just seeing the crew on Pata Negra,” commented Andrew Hall.  “I think that Sam and I are very lucky that we both like to do the same thing. I don’t know how many years I have got left, but we would like to be back next year. We are learning more and more about the boat; we are getting her going quicker and coming up with new ideas. Next for Pata Negra will be the RORC Caribbean 600 and then the boat will be on charter for other Caribbean regattas. Pata Negra will then return to the UK, take part in a few RORC races and then the Rolex Fastnet Race this summer, and we are looking forward to that.”

Pata Negra has won IRC One and completed the RORC Transatlantic Race in just under 14 days © Arthur Daniel/RORCPata Negra has won IRC One and completed the RORC Transatlantic Race in just under 14 days © Arthur Daniel/RORC

Father and son owners - Andrew and Sam Hall were racing Lombard 46 Pata Negra (GBR) for the second time in the RORC Transatlantic Race © Arthur Daniel/RORCFather and son owners - Andrew and Sam Hall were racing Lombard 46 Pata Negra (GBR) for the second time in the RORC Transatlantic Race © Arthur Daniel/RORC

“We had a lot more wind than last year. Once we left the Canary Islands we put the kite up and we have had some awesome sailing,” commented Sam Hall. “Fast sailing with white water and just shy of 29 knots of boat speed at times. This was all you could dream of for 14 days: just astounding. A great race and a great team, but the fields of sargassum weed were a bit of a hinderance at times. We had to take the kite down on numerous intervals then back the boat to clear the rudders. Sailing with my dad is great, but like any father and son we have our moments. However, we love each other and have raced across the Atlantic together twice, which is a special achievement. To share that with a special crew has been fantastic. Winning our class is a great achievement and definitely progress from last year; maybe we can build on that and be even better next year.”

Six teams are still racing in the RORC Transatlantic Race. For full coverage, including race updates and stories from the teams, follow the Royal Ocean Racing Club on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. For regular updates including satellite tracking go to: www.rorctransatlantic.rorc.org

Pata Negra was welcomed to the dock with cold beers by Marina Manager Zara Tremlett © Arthur Daniel/RORCPata Negra was welcomed to the dock with cold beers by Marina Manager Zara Tremlett © Arthur Daniel/RORC

Eight boats still racing in the RORC Transatlantic Race

Arrivals continue in Grenada: Henri de Bokay’s Elliott 52 Rafale (GER), skippered by Philipp Kadelbach finished the race on the 18th of January in an elapsed time of 10 days 7hrs 21mins 17 secs © Arthur Daniel/RORC

Friday 20th January, Day 13 Update 1200 UTC
Following the announcement of Teasing Machine’s overall win in the RORC Transatlantic Race, three more teams have finished the 3,000-mile race across the Atlantic Ocean. As with every boat that arrives in Camper & Nicholsons Port Louis Marina, there is a warm greeting on the dock 24-7, followed by cold beers to toast each team’s achievement.

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VIDEO: Winner of the 2023 RORC Transatlantic Race Trophy: Teasing Machine

Overall victory under IRC. Watch the latest video from the RORC Transatlantic Race, with race footage, dockside interviews and onboard action to celebrate the win by RORC Vice Commodore Eric de Turckheim and his team on board NMYD 54 Teasing Machine (FRA). Teasing Machine lifted the RORC Transatlantic Race Trophy at Camper & Nicholsons Port Louis Marina in Grenada, becoming the first boat to win the trophy on two occasions; Teasing Machine also won overall in 2017. This year’s triumph follows on from their overall win under IRC for the 2022 Rolex Middle Sea Race, so Teasing Machine will be going for a hattrick of victories in next month’s RORC Caribbean 600.

TEASING MACHINE IRC OVERALL WINNER – 2023 RORC TRANSATLANTIC RACE

2023 RORC Transatlantic Race Trophy IRC Overall Winner - Eric de Turckheim's NMYD 54 Teasing Machine (FRA) with Nikoyan Roberts, Grenada Tourism Authority and Steve Cole, RORC Racing Manager © Arthur Daniel

RORC Vice Commodore Eric de Turckheim, racing his NMYD 54 Teasing Machine (FRA) is the overall winner under IRC for the 2023 RORC Transatlantic Race. While 10 boats are still racing, none of them can beat Teasing Machine’s corrected time under IRC for overall victory. However, the battle is still on for those racing for class honours and special prizes.

Teasing Machine Crew: Crew: Eric de Turckheim, Laurent Pages, Quentin Bouchacourt, Bertrand Castelnerac, Aymeric Chappellier, Quentin le Nabour, Paco Lepoutre, Gabriele Olivo, Christian Ponthieu, Jerome Teillet

Banner shot Teasing MachineCold beers and a warm welcome to Grenada for the crew of Teasing Machine shortly after arrival © Arthur Daniel/RORCTeasing Machine lifted the RORC Transatlantic Race Trophy at Camper & Nicholsons Port Louis Marina becoming the first boat to win the trophy on two occasions; Teasing Machine also won overall in 2017. This year’s triumph follows on from their overall win under IRC for the 2022 Rolex Middle Sea Race, so Teasing Machine will be going for a hattrick of victories in next month’s RORC Caribbean 600.

Eric de Turckheim James Tomlinson RORCEric de Turckheim said it was a team effort when interviewed about winning the 2023 RORC Transatlantic Race Overall © James Mitchell/RORC

“Winning the trophy for the second time after such an incredible race is fantastic,” commented Eric de Turckheim. “It was downwind all the way at huge speed, with very tough competition from Black Pearl, Rafale and Tulikettu. All these 50-footers are in different configuration, so Teasing Machine had to be in top, top form. The biggest battle was with Black Pearl; we were constantly watching each other on the tracker updates to see how we were performing. This year’s RORC Transatlantic Race is probably the most amazing race I have done. It was not individuality which gave us success in the RORC Transatlantic Race, it was because of an incredibly good team with extraordinarily good team spirit.”

“Many things have worked for us in this race and it is a great feeling to win,” commented Teasing Machine Tactician Laurent Pages. “We have been optimising the boat since 2017 and we are very happy with the boat’s performance and reliability. Good preparation has been a key area of our success and the team has been very efficient in getting the fastest boat speed that we can. We have four drivers and Eric (de Turckheim) has the speed record for this race (25.72kn), but all of the drivers are fast and that gives us consistency. Good team work between the driver and trim team is essential; the team constantly delivers the fastest speed possible.”

Teasing Machine makes her way to Camper & Nicholsons Port Louis Marina after crossing the finish line in Grenada  © Arthur Daniel/RORCTeasing Machine makes her way to Camper & Nicholsons Port Louis Marina after crossing the finish line in Grenada © Arthur Daniel/RORC

For full coverage of the RORC Transatlantic Race, including race updates and stories from the teams, follow the Royal Ocean Racing Club on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. For regular updates including satellite tracking go to: www.rorctransatlantic.rorc.org

Follow the race here: http://rorctransatlantic.rorc.org/tracking/2023-fleet-tracking.html

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Royal Ocean Racing Club - since 1925

The RORC was founded in 1925 to encourage long distance yacht racing and the design, building and navigation of sailing vessels in which speed and seaworthiness are combined. Today the club encourages ocean, long distance and other forms of yacht racing and yachting activity.