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Two Handed Jangada win the RORC Transatlantic Race

(Right) Richard Palmer's JPK 10.10 Jangada, racing two handed with Jeremy Waitt (left) receive the magnificent  RORC Transatlantic Race Trophy from Dr Clarice Modeste-Curwen, Minister for Tourism and Civil Aviation, Grenada © RORC/Arthur Daniel

Richard Palmer's British JPK 10.10 Jangada was presented with the RORC Transatlantic Trophy in Grenada at a ceremony and prize giving banquet held at Camper & Nicholsons Victory Bar and Restaurant. Racing Two Handed with Jeremy Waitt, Jangada scored the best corrected time under IRC to win the race overall and completed the 3,000nm race in 17 Days 10 hrs 11 mins 06 secs. Jangada is the first Two Handed team to win the antique sterling silver trophy, as well as the smallest boat to do so.

“This win absolutely exceeded all our expectations – a great start to the season!” commented Jangada’s owner, Richard Palmer. “The competition out there certainly gave us a run for our money - Childhood 1 was doing 20 knots and we could never match that speed, and Pata Negra 12 knots, but we just said bring it on and we raced hard all the way to the finish. Persistence and perseverance were the key to keep going for each three-hour watch. It was hard work but it paid off. It is absolutely fabulous to be back at Port Louis Marina in Grenada. We were here two years ago and we are looking forward to celebrating for a few days.”

2019 rorc transaltantic race dec 10th jangada arthur daniel low res 41
The first two handed team and smallest boat to win the RORC Transatlantic Race - Jangada, Richard Palmer's British JPK 10.10 (Cowes, Isle of Wight) © RORC/Arthur Daniel

Dockside interviews with Richard Palmer and Jeremy Waitt/JPK 10.10 Jangada © RORC/Louay Habib

Guest of honour at the prizegiving was Dr Clarice Modeste-Curwen, Minister for Tourism and Civil Aviation. Honoured guests included Patricia Maher, CEO of the Grenada Tourism Authority, Nikoyan Roberts, Manager of Nautical Development for Grenada, Assistant Chinel Sandy, and Charlotte Fairhead, Port Louis Marina Manager.

2019 rorc transaltantic race dec 11th prize giving arthur daniel low res 19© RORC/Arthur Daniel

For Jangada the decisive strategy was using weather forecasts to decide on the optimum route to Grenada, as Jeremy Waitt explains: “It was a progressive strategy; going to a certain point and then making the decision based on the forecast, trying to pick a route through. The big decision came on day 5, whether to stay north up against the high pressure or dive south for more breeze. By day 7 there would have been no get out, we would be committed. It was always going to be a bit of a gamble, but we managed to pick our way through a few light patches and when we got into the breeze we kept pushing. Jangada kept moving and although the boats to the south were faster, they were going a long way to get to the breeze. We think we got the navigation right and it's great to be here and to have won the race.”

About 1,000nm from Grenada, Jeremy Waitt fell overboard while re-setting a twisted spinnaker. Jeremy was clipped onto the boat using a tether which is a requirement for all RORC offshore races. The sea state was up and had Jeremy not been tethered to Jangada, he would have disappeared from sight very quickly.:

“A wave caught us and I went straight over the side,” explained Waitt. “I was being dragged at seven knots and that is a moment when you think about a few things, when you are in the middle of the ocean. The survival gene kicks in fairly quickly and it was a good bit of team work to get back on board. I have a few bruises but I don't think Richard was too impressed as I was slowing the boat down! When I was safely back on board, Richard said, ‘shall we have a cup of tea?’ I replied, let's get the spinnaker back up first!”

Benedikt Clauberg's Swiss First 47.7 Kali was the final boat to finish the race. Crossing the line at 19:28:19 UTC on 11 December, the crew were in time to join the prizegiving party and will also celebrate finishing the race for the second year in a row.

kali banner shotTeam Kali - happy to finish their second RORC Transatlantic Race in Grenada after an 18 day crossing © RORC/Arthur Daniel

Wanted: sailors and boat owners to take on exciting new offshore Olympic event

Sun Fast 3600 Bellino raced by Rob Craigie & Deb Fish © Rick Tomlinson

The RYA is on the hunt for sailors and boat owners interested in the new double-handed mixed offshore event that will debut at the Paris 2024 Olympics.This exciting discipline will see mixed pairs battle it out over a 4 day offshore race in a new showcase for the sport.

With planning for Paris 2024 already underway, the RYA has registered an entry for a British team in the 2020 World Sailing Offshore World Championship (OWC), held in conjunction with the Rolex Middle Sea Race.

The RYA would now like to hear from any motivated and experienced sailors interested in trying double-handed offshore sailing, and they are also keen to hear from any boat owners who may either be looking for a racing partner or prepared to loan or charter a suitable boat to others.

Jack Fenwick, RYA Keelboat Manager, is hoping to bring interested parties together in early 2020 with a view to running doublehanded offshore taster sessions and training next spring.

"Double-handed offshore sailing could appeal to a wide range of people from professional sailors to existing or former international sailors, or perhaps even those just graduating from our RYA British Keelboat Academy," he said.

"At this stage we would like to hear from as many people as possible to try and build a database of interested parties. We would particularly like to hear from yacht owners who might be looking for partners to get afloat and give it a try."

In a vote of confidence for the existing RORC racing series, the RYA has announced that selection for the OWC, taking place in Malta in October 2020 in L30 yachts, will be based solely on the popular RORC Channel Race which starts from Cowes on August 1.

raging bee pwdgbowl19 968The RYA is on the hunt for sailors and boat owners interested in the new double-handed mixed offshore event that will debut at the Paris 2024 Olympics © Paul Wyeth/pwpictures.com

"We believe the existing RORC Racing calendar of events will provide excellent training opportunities and should be a huge advantage to British medal hopes in 2024. It would be great to see lots of teams fighting it out for the double-handed trophies within the RORC's Season Points Championship" said RYA Director of Racing, Ian Walker.

RORC Racing Manager Chris Stone explained: "In 2020 the Channel Race will run as normal for our IRC rated fleet but we will extend the race for those double handed mixed entries who wish to be considered in the RYA selection for the OWC. The intention is for this selection event to best replicate the duration of the OWC which is likely to be 3 or 4 days."

RORC racing is IRC rated and not one design so in order to best reflect the criteria of the new Olympic equipment, the RYA selection for the OWC will only be open to fixed keel, monohulls within a proposed IRC rating band between 0.990 and 1.055 (subject to confirmation).

Ian Walker: "We need to strike a balance between keeping the rating band as narrow as possible to minimise the impact of the boats' rating differences on the results and making the selection as accessible as possible for a range of suitable existing boats. We will confirm the rating band after any revisions to the IRC rule for 2020."

The official selection policy will be published by 1 March 2020 but anybody interested in getting involved in double handed, mixed offshore sailing is warmly encouraged to register their interest by sending an e-mail containing details of their sailing experience, aspirations and their boat (if they have one) to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

If more than 20 nations enter the OWC then there will need to be a country qualification event in Europe in May / June 2020. Britain would then need to send a representative team to aim to qualify a place for Britain for the OWC in Malta and an announcement will be made on how these representatives will be selected once the details are announced by World Sailing in due course.

www.rorc.org

Jangada finish RORC Transatlantic Race

Richard Palmer and Jeremy Waitt celebrate dockside at Camper & Nicholsons Port Louis Marina © RORC/Arthur Daniel

Jangada, Richard Palmer's JPK 1010 racing two-handed with Jeremy Waitt, crossed the finish line outside Camper & Nicholsons Port Louis Marina, Grenada on Tuesday 10th December, 2019 at 21:11:06 UTC. Their elapsed time was 17 days 10 hours 11 mins 06 secs.

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Dark Shadow Shine in Grenada

Dark Shadow approaching the finish line at Camper & Nicholsons Port Louis Marina, Grenada - Photo © RORC / Arthur Daniel

French Wally 100 Dark Shadow finished the 2019 RORC Transatlantic Race on Friday 6th December in an elapsed time of 13 days 9 hours 11 mins and 3 secs. Dark Shadow was sailed by Andre Auberton-Herve (FRA), and skippered by Yerin Hobson (AUS).

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Childhood 1 wins the IMA Trophy

Childhood 1 crew: Bouwe Bekking, Antonio Cuervas Mons, Ysbrand Endt, Pablo Garcia Mujica, Julius Hallstrom, Edmond Hilhorst, Steven Melkman, Pelle Norberg, Simbad Quiroga, Aage Reerslev, Pieter Tack, Jelmer van Beek, Jorden van Rooijen, Laura van Veen. Photo © RORC / Arthur Daniel

Swedish VO65 Childhood 1, skippered by Bouwe Bekking, has taken Line Honours in the 2019 RORC Transatlantic Race. Childhood 1 crossed the finish line outside Camper & Nicholsons Port Louis Marina, Grenada in an elapsed time of 11 days 11 hours 34 mins 49 secs.

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Royal Ocean Racing Club to finish the Rolex Fastnet Race in Cherbourg

The City of Cherbourg will host the finish of the Rolex Fastnet Race in 2021 and 2023 © JM Enault /Ville de Cherbourg en Cotentin

The Royal Ocean Racing Club (RORC), organisers of the Rolex Fastnet Race, announced at a press conference today that the City of Cherbourg will host the finish of the Rolex Fastnet Race for the 2021 and 2023 editions of the biennial race. The move encourages and secures the future development of the race and will open it to more competitors; in 2019 the race had a waiting list of 150 boats.

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Farewell Lanzarote! RORC Transatlantic Underway

The 6th edition of the RORC Transatlantic Race got underway on time with the fleet starting from outside Marina Lanzarote at 1100 UTC on Saturday 23 November, 2019. After months of preparation, the international fleet have started one of the most iconic offshore races with a stiff breeze gusting up to 25 knots.

After the start, the fleet passed a turning mark at Puerto Calero Marina before leaving Fuerteventura and Tenerife to port and then heading out into the Atlantic Ocean. The first 125nm of the course are both strategic and tactical, with land effects providing both snakes and ladders. The fleet are expected to experience gusty conditions for the first 24 hours, with rain squalls varying both the wind speed and direction.

"15-20 knots from north-northwest was a little more than forecast with squally conditions giving even more breeze," commented RORC Race Officer Steve Cole. "The reaching start was without incident and it was great to see the fleet make good headway at the beginning of this long race. Childhood 1 was just 10 seconds shy of the line at the gun, and Pata Negra and Dark Shadow also got away well."

dark shadowFrench Wally 100 Dark Shadow - an impressive sight at the start of the RORC Transatlantic Race © Joaquin Vera/Calero Marinas/RORC

The fast reaching start was ideal for Childhood 1, skippered by Bouwe Bekking. The Swedish VO65 was the first yacht to the mark off Puerto Calero Marina and once clear of the wind shadow of the surrounding hills, they hoisted their A3, blasting through La Bocayna, the strait between Lanzarote and Fuerteventura. Childhood 1 is expected to round Tenerife later tonight. French Wally 100 Dark Shadow, skippered by Yerin Hobson, was just three miles astern. Giles Redpath's British Lombard 46 Pata Negra got off to a good start. Skippered by Andy Lis with a young crew, the team were seven miles behind Dark Shadow, the largest yacht in the fleet.

Swiss 47.7 Kali, skippered by Benedikt Clauberg is competing in the RORC Transatlantic Race for the second year in succession. "We have new sails and an experienced crew this year, with six teams members having obtained their Yachtmaster Offshore qualification. Our dual aims are to be safe and fast, and with that in mind we have three modes on board: race, safe and survival - I hope we don't have to go into survival mode but we are prepared for it all the same, including a full man overboard test on the eve of the race," explained Clauberg.

pata negraAndy Lis and his young crew on Giles Redpath's Pata Negra © Joaquin Vera/Calero Marinas/RORC

kaliSecond RORC Transat for Swiss 47.7 Kali, skippered by Benedikt Clauberg  © Joaquin Vera/Calero Marinas/RORC

Richard Palmer's British JPK 10.10 Jangada is also taking part in their second RORC Transatlantic Race. Richard is once again racing two handed, this time with Jeremy Waitt, who contacted the RORC Race Team shortly after the start:

"A nice breeze gave us a tight reach and we just made the turning mark of Puerto Calero without having to tack. A good squall came in on the turning mark so we got pretty wet. It cleared quick, however, as we came around the southerly tip, we got hit hard by another larger squall reaching 25 knots of wind speed. It was a good spanking - a nice and early reminder who is boss out here! We reefed and ended up on main only for 15 minutes. We are now in blue water sailing mode, 80º off the breeze in 18 knots. It looks like a few more squalls are on the way and we have 120 miles to go to Tenerife, or as we say, twice across the English Channel!"

jangadaRichard Palmer and Jeremy Waitt racing Two Handed on JPK 10.10 Jangada at the start of the RORC Transatlantic Race  © Joaquin Vera/Calero Marinas/RORC

José Juan Calero, CEO of Calero Marinas, accompanied by RORC Commodore Steven Anderson and RORC CEO Eddie Warden Owen watched as the fleet set off. RORC Racing Manager Chris Stone, with RORC Race Officer Steve Cole officiated on the Committee Boat.

 

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Royal Ocean Racing Club - since 1925

The RORC was founded in 1925 to encourage long distance yacht racing and the design, building and navigation of sailing vessels in which speed and seaworthiness are combined. Today the club encourages ocean, long distance and other forms of yacht racing and yachting activity.