Royal Ocean Racing Club Ltd.
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The Griffin Fund

 The Griffin Initiative – not a mythical beast! 

One main aim: To encourage young people into the sport of offshore racing.

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RORC Nelson’s Cup Series set for Antigua - Notice of Race available

The Notice of Race is now available for the new RORC Nelson's Cup three-day series starting on 13th February 2023 © Tim Wright/Photoaction.com

Deep into the winter months of the Northern Hemisphere, Antigua is blessed with warm trade winds and ocean swell. The RORC Caribbean 600 is a bucket-list offshore event for thousands of Corinthian and professional sailors,­­ and for 2023 and beyond, the desire for more boats to participate in a variety of races has led to the creation of the RORC Nelson’s Cup Series. The 11-day programme features all the hallmarks of racing with the Royal Ocean Racing Club, including professional race management and memorable social events.

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Jangada wins RORC Yacht of the Year

Three cheers for 2022 RORC Yacht of the Year + Season's Points Championship winner:  Richard Palmer - JPK 1010 Jangada (GBR) with co-skippers Rupert Holmes & Jeremy Waitt © Rich Bowen Photography

LONDON, UK (November 5, 2022) - The 2022 Royal Ocean Racing Club Annual Dinner and Prize Giving was held in the Ballroom of the InterContinental London Park Lane.

Celebrating an impressive season of RORC racing, over 200 guests enjoyed a cocktail reception and gourmet dinner at the luxury five-star hotel. Sailors came from all over Europe and further afield for a night of festivities with the RORC. A glittering array of prestigious prizes were presented to the season’s winners. With trophies dating back over a century, the RORC Season’s Points Championship is part of yacht racing history; it is the largest yacht racing series anywhere in the world.

The 2022 RORC Season’s Points Championship featured 16 offshore races held in nine different countries. The exciting programme included: the Rolex Middle Sea Race, the RORC Transatlantic Race, the RORC Caribbean 600, the SSE Renewables Round Ireland Yacht Race, the inaugural Roschier Baltic Sea Race, and the Sevenstar Round Britain & Ireland Race.

For 10 months, over 400 boats and 5000 sailors raced an astounding variety of offshore certified keelboats. Ranked under the IRC Rating Rule, jointly administered by the RORC and the UNCL, competition was thrilling and close, right through the classes. The RORC Season’s Points Championship also awards prizes to Multihulls and Class40s.

© Rich Bowen Photography© Rich Bowen Photography

2022 RORC Yacht of the Year + Season’s Points Championship Winner:
Richard Palmer's JPK 1010 Jangada - racing Two-Handed with co-skippers Jeremy Waitt/Rupert Holmes

Winning the RORC Season’s Points Championship is an achievement desired by any serious offshore sailor. The Overall winner of the 2022 championship, lifting the Jazz Trophy was Richard Palmer’s JPK 1010 Jangada, which was raced Two-Handed with two co-skippers during the season, Jeremy Waitt and Rupert Holmes.

Jangada completed 12 races, accumulating a massive haul of points for overall victory. But perhaps the best indicator of Jangada’s performance was that the team was victorious in two classes, IRC Two-Handed and IRC Three, where the winner is decided by the best five races in the series. Jangada was also the winner of a new trophy; The Gordon Applebey Trophy for the best six races in IRC Overall.

In IRC Three with 71 entries, Jangada narrowly beat Sun Fast 3200 Cora, raced by Tim Goodhew & Kelvin Matthews. Cora’s impressive season was rewarded with The Assuage Trophy. Mike Yate’s J/109 JAGO was third. In IRC Two-Handed with 99 teams, runner-up to Jangada was Cora and third was Sun Fast 3300 Chilli Pepper, raced by Jim & Ellie Driver.

L to R: James Neville, RORC Commodore, Rupert Holmes, Richard Palmer, Jeremy Waitt. Jangada received a haul of prizes including the Jazz Trophy for IRC Overall and the Somerset Memorial Trophy for RORC Yacht of the Year © Rich Bowen PhotographyL to R: James Neville, RORC Commodore, Rupert Holmes, Richard Palmer, Jeremy Waitt. Jangada received a haul of prizes including the Jazz Trophy for IRC Overall and the Somerset Memorial Trophy for RORC Yacht of the Year © Rich Bowen Photography

Jangada’s outstanding performance was rewarded by the RORC Race Committee awarding Jangada with the Somerset Memorial Trophy for RORC Yacht of the Year. Richard Palmer, Rupert Holmes and Jeremy Waitt received a standing ovation as they received a haul of awards.

Jangada’s ambitious resolve to win the RORC Season’s Points Championship started in 2018 when Richard Palmer and Jeremy Waitt narrowly missed out in their first attempt, thwarted by rig failure in their final race. In 2020, after a superb start with an overall win in the RORC Transatlantic Race, the pandemic took away any chance of winning. This year, Jangada sealed off an immense season with the overall win under IRC for the Sevenstar Round Britain & Ireland Race.

“Five years ago, we set out to win the Jazz Trophy but we had no idea where this campaign was going to lead us,” commented Richard Palmer. “Finally, this year has exceeded all our expectations, winning the Championship overall and winning the RORC Yacht of the Year. A massive thank you to my co-skippers for their huge commitment, and to our families and friends that have supported us on this fabulous journey.”

Richard Palmer's JPK 1010 Jangada (GBR) racing Two-Handed with co-skippers Jeremy Waitt/Rupert Holmes win the 2022 RORC Yacht of the Year and the RORC Season's Points Championship © Paul Wyeth/pwpictures.comRichard Palmer's JPK 1010 Jangada (GBR) racing Two-Handed with co-skippers Jeremy Waitt/Rupert Holmes win the 2022 RORC Yacht of the Year and the RORC Season's Points Championship © Paul Wyeth/pwpictures.com

List of Winners & Special Prizes awarded HERE
Full results HERE
View all images from the Awards Ceremony in the RORC Photo Gallery HERE

IRC Superzero - Telefonica Black

VO70 Telefonica Black, skippered by Lance Shepherd was the winner of the 18-team IRC Superzero Class. Runner-up was the Polish National Foundation’s VO70 I Love Poland, third was the VPLP/Verdier 100 Comanche.

“Our aim to make big boat sailing fun and accessible has been achieved. We are proud to have won IRC Superzero,” commented Telefonica Black’s Lance Shepherd. “We run Telefonica with a skipper and three regular crew, with up to 14 guests. Our team is different for every RORC race so they have to pull together as a unit. We try to make the experience a fun, learning environment with a huge emphasis on safety and seamanship. Everyone gets to try every position onboard; our mantra is to enjoy the experience. If we get results, that’s the icing on the cake.”

VO70 Telefonica Black, skippered by Lance Shepherd was the winner of the 18-team IRC Superzero Class © Rich Bowen PhotographyVO70 Telefonica Black, skippered by Lance Shepherd was the winner of the 18-team IRC Superzero Class © Rich Bowen Photography

VO70 Telefonica Black, skippered by Lance Shepherd was the winner of IRC Superzero in the 2022 RORC Season's Points Championship  © James TomlinsonVO70 Telefonica Black, skippered by Lance Shepherd was the winner of IRC Superzero in the 2022 RORC Season's Points Championship © James Tomlinson

IRC Zero – INO XXX

RORC Commodore James Neville racing his HH42 INO XXX won the 75-strong IRC Zero Class, lifting the Europeans Cup. This was INO XXX’s third class win in the RORC Season’s Points Championship. Mark Emerson’s A13 Phosphorous II was runner up, with RORC Vice Commodore Eric de Turckheim’s NMYD 54 Teasing Machine third.

One of the highlights of the season for INO XXX was the 230-mile Myth of Malham Race. INO XXX won overall beating Niklas Zennström's brand new Swedish CF-520 Rán 8 into second place.

"It was great to see so many boats out racing, with the RORC making the most of the Jubilee Weekend!" exclaimed James Neville. "The start was quite difficult; we had to put a few gybes in to hold position on the south side of the Solent. With tide under us, it was a tight call getting past the Shingles. The crucial tactic racing to the west was making Portland on one gybe, and that maximized our VMG. Rán sailed deeper than us and got to the Eddystone Lighthouse two hours ahead of us, but we knew that on IRC corrected they needed about four hours in the race. Rán did have to foot off as they were on a tighter angle, which meant they had to sail more miles, but INO goes well on a tight reach. The big decision racing east was staying quite south on the return past Portland. We had good tide all the way to the Isle of Wight and with the easterly coming in and tidal relief from the Island, that was what did it for us. The wind died for the boats behind and they had foul tide."

RORC Commodore James Neville (right) is presented with the Europeans Cup by RORC Racing Manager Chris Stone for winning IRC Zero in his HH42 INO XXX © Rich Bowen PhotographyRORC Commodore James Neville (right) is presented with the Europeans Cup by RORC Racing Manager Chris Stone for winning IRC Zero in his HH42 INO XXX © Rich Bowen Photography

Winning IRC Zero and the Europeans Cup - RORC Commodore James Neville racing his HH42 INO XXX won the 75-strong class  © Rick Tomlinson/https://www.rick-tomlinson.com/ Winning IRC Zero and the Europeans Cup - RORC Commodore James Neville racing his HH42 INO XXX won the 75-strong class © Rick Tomlinson/https://www.rick-tomlinson.com/

IRC One – Bulldog

Derek Shakespeare’s J/122 Bulldog was the winner of the 103-strong IRC One Class, lifting the Trenchemer Cup. Michael O'Donnell’s J/121 Darkwood was second and Jean-Eudes Renier & Rob Bottomley racing MAT12 Sailplane was third. Bulldog also won the Peter Harrison Youth Trophy for a crew with a third under 25.

“The key for our RORC Season win was consistency,” commented Derek Shakespeare. “Albeit with only one class win, in our six races we finished five on the podium. We kept the boat moving all the time and made some good navigational calls. It was great to win our class in the De Guingand Bowl - there were plenty of tactical options as the course took us first to lines of longitude rather than fixed marks. Between the Needles and St Catherine’s we chose to stay close to the Island and that paid for us in the end.”

Derek Shakespeare’s J/122 Bulldog was the winner of the 103-strong IRC One Class, lifting the Trenchemer Cup  © Rich Bowen PhotographyDerek Shakespeare’s J/122 Bulldog was the winner of the 103-strong IRC One Class, lifting the Trenchemer Cup © Rich Bowen Photography

IRC One winners - Derek Shakespeare’s J/122 Bulldog © Rick Tomlinson/https://www.rick-tomlinson.com/IRC One winners - Derek Shakespeare’s J/122 Bulldog © Rick Tomlinson/https://www.rick-tomlinson.com/

IRC Two - Bellino

Rob Craigie’s Sun Fast 3600 Bellino, racing Two-Handed with Deb Fish was the winner of IRC Two in a class of 88 boats, lifting the Emily Verger Plate. Nick Martin’s Sun Fast 3600 Diablo, racing with Cal Finlayson was a close second for the season. Jim & Ellie Driver racing Sun Fast 3300 Chilli Pepper was third.

The Corinthian team of Rob and Deb on Bellino have sailed a huge number of miles together, including winning the RORC IRC Two-Handed season three times in the past five years. This year, for the first time, Bellino competed in the Sevenstar Round Britain & Ireland Race. Winning IRC Two for the 1805-mile race resulted in class victory for the season. Bellino had an epic duel with Sam White and Sam North, also racing Two-Handed with JPK 1080 Mzungu!

“We knew from the start that there would be strong competition with boat-on-boat racing and that was a big reason for entering the race,” commented Bellino’s Deb Fish after finishing the Sevenstar Round Britain & Ireland Race. “We could see Mzungu! for 95% of the race. In that situation, for every mile you are looking for that extra inch, you have to short tack to stay in pressure or out of bad tide. It was great racing, but also stressful; an absolutely cracking race.”

“It’s just about sailing the boat,” said Rob Craigie. “You have to get it going; tweak the sails, set up the instruments and also have fun and enjoy it. This race has been 1,800 miles of close racing at the highest level. All you can ever do is the best you can.”

Rob Craigie’s Sun Fast 3600 Bellino, racing Two-Handed with Deb Fish was the winner of IRC Two in a class of 88 boats, lifting the Emily Verger Plate © Rich Bowen PhotographyRob Craigie’s Sun Fast 3600 Bellino, racing Two-Handed with Deb Fish was the winner of IRC Two in a class of 88 boats, lifting the Emily Verger Plate © Rich Bowen Photography

Rob Craigie’s Sun Fast 3600 Bellino, racing Two-Handed with Deb Fish © Rick Tomlinson/https://www.rick-tomlinson.com/Rob Craigie’s Sun Fast 3600 Bellino, racing Two-Handed with Deb Fish © Rick Tomlinson/https://www.rick-tomlinson.com/

IRC Four – Morning After

Stuart Greenfield S&S 34 Morning After was the winner of IRC Four lifting the Cowland Trophy and also the Freddie Morgan Trophy for the Best Classic Yacht. Paul Scott’s Sigma 38 Spirit was runner-up, with Kirsteen Donaldson’s x-332 Pyxis completing the podium.

“Morning After was left in a yard for 21 years. It took 18 months because of Covid to rebuild her and I think I've aged 20 years doing it,” commented Stuart Greenfield.

Morning After competed in six RORC races in 2022. Stuart raced Morning After for much of the season Two-Handed with Louise Clayton. However, for the Sevenstar Round Britain & Ireland Race, Morning After was fully crewed with the addition of RORC Admiral Mike Greville and Frederick Neville-Jones. Racing with Louise Clayton, Stuart’s 1968 Morning After won IRC Two-Handed in a class of 45 for the 2022 Cowes Dinard St Malo Race.

“Morning After is a brilliant boat on the beat and we stayed on starboard tack all the way to Casquets. In the morning, we had no breeze and at one point, we were going backwards on the tide and we thought we had lost the race. However, the wind picked up from the north and we got going again before the boats in front of us got the new wind. That is the luck of being a small boat, but we had to get the tide tactics absolutely spot on!”

Stuart Greenfield S&S 34 Morning After was the winner of IRC Four, lifting the Cowland Trophy and also the Freddie Morgan Trophy for the Best Classic Yacht. James Neville awards the silverware to Stuart Greenfield, & Louise Clayton © Rich Bowen PhotographyStuart Greenfield S&S 34 Morning After was the winner of IRC Four, lifting the Cowland Trophy and also the Freddie Morgan Trophy for the Best Classic Yacht. James Neville awards the silverware to Stuart Greenfield, & Louise Clayton © Rich Bowen Photography

Stuart Greenfield S&S 34 Morning After was the winner of IRC Four lifting the Cowland Trophy and also the Freddie Morgan Trophy for the Best Classic Yacht © Rick Tomlinson/https://www.rick-tomlinson.com/Stuart Greenfield S&S 34 Morning After was the winner of IRC Four lifting the Cowland Trophy and also the Freddie Morgan Trophy for the Best Classic Yacht © Rick Tomlinson/https://www.rick-tomlinson.com/

MOCRA Class – Maserati

Giovanni Soldini’s Multi70 Maserati was the winner of the Multihull Class. After MOCRA time correction Maserati was the winner of the RORC Caribbean 600. Despite not winning on corrected time, Maserati’s golden race was the RORC Transatlantic Race, taking Line Honours in a 4000-mile shoot-out with PowerPlay and Argo. “It was a breathtaking race! Our crew gave their all and Maserati Multi70 really made the difference," Soldini rejoiced. “I am very satisfied. The result of the work of these years is there for all to see. It has been a very long process of research and development.”

Giovanni Soldini’s Multi70 Maserati (ITA) was the winner of the Multihull Class © Arthur Daniel/RORCGiovanni Soldini’s Multi70 Maserati (ITA) was the winner of the Multihull Class © Arthur Daniel/RORC

Class40 - Mussulo 40

The RORC Class40 champion for 2022 was James Stableford’s Mussulo 40, winning the Concise Trophy. Runner-up was Antoine Magre’s Palanad 3 and third was Greg Leonard’s Kite. Twenty Class40 competed in RORC races during 2022, including nine for the RORC Caribbean 600 which was won by Herve Thomas’ Finimmo.

The 2023 RORC Season’s Points Championship has already started with an overall win for RORC Vice Commodore Eric de Turckheim’s Teasing Machine in the Rolex Middle Sea Race. The 15-race series will continue with the RORC Transatlantic Race starting from Marina Lanzarote on the 8th January. 2023 also marks a special occasion for the Royal Ocean Racing Club with the 50th edition of the Rolex Fastnet Race starting from Cowes on the 22nd July.

The RORC Class40 champion for 2022 was Jose Guilherme Caldas’ Mussulo 40, winning the Concise Trophy  © Paul Wyeth/pwpictures.comThe RORC Class40 champion for 2022 was James Stableford's Mussulo 40, winning the Concise Trophy © Paul Wyeth/pwpictures.com

For more information: www.rorc.org

DAZZLING CAST FOR RORC TRANSATLANTIC RACE

Ross Applebey's Oyster 48 Scarlet Oyster will return to the RORC Transatlantic Race after a very close battle for the overall win against the final victor, the 100ft Comanche, in the 2022 edition of the race © Arthur Daniel/RORC

Entries are ramping up for the ninth edition of the RORC Transatlantic Race, promising thrilling battles right through the fleet. Twenty one teams from nine nations have so far expressed their intention to race 3,000-miles across the Atlantic Ocean. Organised by the Royal Ocean Racing Club and supported by Calero Marinas and the International Maxi Association, along with Yacht Club de France, the RORC fleet will set off from Marina Lanzarote on the 8th of January 2023, bound for Camper & Nicholsons Port Louis Marina Grenada.

Two Superyachts are favourites to contest the IMA Transatlantic Trophy for Monohull Line Honours. The largest boat currently confirmed for the 2023 RORC Transatlantic Race is the 115ft Swan Jasi skippered by Toby Clarke. The 107ft Wally Spirit of Malouen X skippered by Stephane Neve will be an equal match for Jasi. Spirit of Malouen’s latest triumph was winning the Maxi 1 Class at this year’s Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez, significantly beating Jasi. However, the 3,000-mile RORC Transatlantic Race is a very different contest to inshore racing in the Mediterranean.

Joining the modern Supermaxis on the start line will be two renowned classic Maxis. The famous 73ft ketch Pen Duick VI was built for Eric Tabarly’s 1973 Whitbread Round the World Race and for the RORC Transatlantic Race, Marie Tabarly will skipper the boat, as she did for the 2022 Sevenstar Round Britain & Ireland Race. L'Esprit D'Equipe, winner of the 1985–86 Whitbread Round the World Race, will be skippered by Atlantic racing legend Lionel Regnier. The fascinating encounter pits two historic yachts against each other rated under IRC, making a fair match after time correction.

Contesting the IMA Transatlantic Trophy for Monohull Line Honours is largest boat currently confirmed for the 2023 RORC Transatlantic Race - the 115ft Swan Jasi skippered by Toby Clarke © ClubSwan Racing / Studio BorlenghiContesting the IMA Transatlantic Trophy for Monohull Line Honours is largest boat currently confirmed for the 2023 RORC Transatlantic Race - the 115ft Swan Jasi skippered by Toby Clarke © ClubSwan Racing / Studio Borlenghi

Marie Tabarly has entered the legendary 1973 ketch Pen Duick VI - built for Eric Tabarly's 1973 Whitbread Round the World Race entry © Rick TomlinsonMarie Tabarly has entered the legendary 1973 ketch Pen Duick VI - built for Eric Tabarly's 1973 Whitbread Round the World Race entry © Rick Tomlinson

Giovanni Soldini’s Multi 70 Maserati (ITA) is all set to defend their Multihull Line Honours win last year. Maserati was one of five 70-foot trimarans competing in the Rolex Middle Sea Race this October and several are expected to enter the RORC Transatlantic Race. The latest is MOD70 Snowflake (CAY) with American Frank Slootman at the helm. For the Rolex Middle Sea Race, Gavin Brady, Tom Cheney and Ryan Breymaier were on board Snowflake. Formerly Phaedo 3, Snowflake now has a taller rig, longer bowsprit and lifting T-Foils, similar to Maserati. Yann Marilley’s 18-metre VPLP designed catamaran No Limit (FRA) is a confirmed entry. While No Limit is not as quick as Maserati and Snowflake, after MOCRA time correction No Limit has the ability to win the class.

Giovanni Soldini’s Multi 70 Maserati (ITA) is all set to defend their Multihull Line Honours win in the 2022 RORC Transatlantic Race  © Tim Wright/Photoaction.comGiovanni Soldini’s Multi 70 Maserati (ITA) is all set to defend their Multihull Line Honours win in the 2022 RORC Transatlantic Race © Tim Wright/Photoaction.com

MOD70 Snowflake (CAY) with American Frank Slootman at the helm  © Roddy Grimes-Graeme/SnowflakeMOD70 Snowflake (CAY) with American Frank Slootman at the helm © Roddy Grimes-Graeme/Snowflake

Four highly diverse performance 50-footers are set for a thrilling battle in the RORC Transatlantic Race. The overall winner and recipient of the RORC Transatlantic Race Trophy is decided by IRC time correction and Teasing Machine, Black Pearl, Tulikettu and Rafale could all be considered as favourites.

The overall winner in 2017, Eric de Turckheim’s NMYD54 Teasing Machine (FRA) was in fine form in October, winning the 2022 Rolex Middle Sea Race overall. Teasing Machine is now many kilogrammes lighter than 2017 and is the most developed of the three out-and-out offshore raceboats set for the race in January 2023.

Botin 56 Black Pearl (GER) is back with Stefan Jentzsch at the helm; this will be Black Pearl’s third start in the RORC Transatlantic Race having suffered gear failure and retirement in the last two editions. Black Pearl has the longest water-line length of the three combatants and has water-ballast to increase righting moment.

The most radical of the three 50-footers is Arto Linnervuo’s Infiniti 52 Tulikettu (FIN) which has a narrower hull and side foils. With an all-up weight of less than 7000kg, Tulikettu is by far the lightest of the three rivals and has the shortest water-line length. However, the Finnish team have the equipment and desire to punch well above their weight.

Skippered by Henri de Bokay the Elliott 52 Rafale (GER) has a canting keel setting it apart from the three other fast 50-footers. Previously as Outsider, the boat competed in the 2017 RORC Transatlantic Race finishing third overall.

Botin 56 Black Pearl (GER) is back with Stefan Jentzsch at the helm; this will be Black Pearl’s third start in the RORC Transatlantic Race  © James Mitchell/RORCBotin 56 Black Pearl (GER) is back with Stefan Jentzsch at the helm; this will be Black Pearl’s third start in the RORC Transatlantic Race © James Mitchell/RORC

A bevvy of cruiser-racers will be competing in the RORC Transatlantic Race. The Swan 601 Lorina 1895, skippered by Ireland’s Ken Docherty is the fastest under the IRC Rating System. Making her race debut is Laurent Courbin’s First 53 Yagiza (FRA), which has recently been modified to include new rudders. Ross Applebey’s Oyster 48 Scarlet Oyster (GBR), skippered by Jules White is back after finishing second overall in 2022. Scarlet Oyster will continue their friendly rivalry with another team of charter guests racing Global Yacht Racing’s First 47.7 EH01 (GBR). Andrew Hall’s Lombard 46 Pata Negra (GBR) returns for its fourth RORC Transatlantic Race. Pata Negra’s best result so far was second overall in 2019.

The largest Two-Handed entry to date is the IMOCA 60 Canada Ocean Racing (CAN) raced by Canadian Scott Shawyer & Briton Alan Roberts. Kate Cope will be racing Sun Fast 3200 Purple Mist (GBR) Two-Handed with Claire Dresser. Purple Mist is the smallest boat in the race and the first Two-Handed women team to take on the RORC Transatlantic Race. Sebastien Saulnier returns for his second race with Sun Fast 3300 Moshi Moshi (FRA) which was third overall in 2021. Peter & Duncan Bacon will be racing Sun Fast 3300 Sea Bear (GBR) in their debut RORC Transatlantic Race. However, Peter Bacon competed in the 2019 Transatlantic Race (west to east) with Xp44 Lucy Georgina, winning IRC Racing 2 and notably beating Pata Negra and Teasing Machine after IRC time correction.

Class40s have featured in the RORC Transatlantic Race since 2015; the first Class40 entry for the 2022 edition is Sabre II which will be raced Two-Handed by Czech sailors Miroslav Jakubcik & Marek Culen who also competed in the 2021 Rolex Fastnet Race

New to the race is Laurent Courbin’s French First 53 Yagiza, skippered by the highly experienced Philippe Falle © Gilles Martin-RagetNew to the race is Laurent Courbin’s French First 53 Yagiza, skippered by the highly experienced Philippe Falle © Gilles Martin-Raget

IRC rating races positively into 2023

VO 70 I Love Poland, skippered by Conrad Lipski s a familiar sight in offshore races, including the Rolex Middle Sea Race.  Image from the 2022 RORC Caribbean 600 © Tim Wright/RORC

The meeting was chaired by Michael Boyd, also Chairman of the IRC Board, and representatives of several countries were present along with the IRC teams from the UK and France, while others around the world participated by video conference, including some new national representatives who will further strengthen IRC.

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UK IRC Nationals to visit Poole

The Royal Ocean Racing Club’s GBR IRC National Championship in 2024 will form part of the International Paint Poole Regatta.  L to R: Andrew Pearce, President International Paint Poole Regatta, Jeremy Wilton, RORC CEO, Michael van Harmelen, International Paint/AkzoNobel, Regional Marketing Manager, Yacht Coatings - at the Southampton International Boat Show © Chris Jones

For the first time, the Royal Ocean Racing Club’s GBR IRC National Championship in 2024 will not take place from the club’s base in Cowes but will form part of the International Paint Poole Regatta. The 26th edition of the IRC Nationals, one of the major annual regattas for the international rating system operated by the RORC will take place on Poole Bay over 25-27th May 2024.

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RORC Office Locations Map
Royal Ocean Racing Club
(General Enquiries, Membership, House)

20 St James's Place
London
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Royal Ocean Racing Club
(Racing Enquiries)

82 High Street
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Isle of Wight
PO31 7AJ
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RORC Cowes Clubhouse


The Parade
Cowes
Isle of Wight
PO31 7QU
UK

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RORC Rating Office
(Seahorse Rating Ltd)

Seahorse Building, Bath Road
Lymington, Hampshire
SO41 3SE
UK

 +44 (0) 1590 677030
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Royal Ocean Racing Club - since 1925

The RORC was founded in 1925 to encourage long distance yacht racing and the design, building and navigation of sailing vessels in which speed and seaworthiness are combined. Today the club encourages ocean, long distance and other forms of yacht racing and yachting activity.